Research by staff affiliated to St. James's Hospital

Recent Submissions

  • NMIC Bulletin Sept 2020, Vol 26 No 2: Useful Medicines information resources for Healthcare Professionals

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-09)
    Bulletin
  • NMIC bulletin Dec 2020, Vol 26; No. 3: Drug Interactions (1) – General Principles

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-12)
    Bulletin
  • Therapeutics Today September 2020

    National Medicines Information Centre; St James's Hospital (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-09)
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today July 2021 Number 7

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-07
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today January 2021 Number 1

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-01)
    NewSLETTER
  • Therapeutics Today February 2021 Number 2

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-02
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today August 2021 Number 8

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-08
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today June 2021 Number 6

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-06
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today September 2021 Number 9

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-09
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today April 2021 Number 4

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-04
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today March 2021 Number 3

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-03
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today December 2020 Number 12

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-12)
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today May 2021 Number 5

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-05
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today November 2020

    National Medicines Information Centre (2020-11)
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today October 2020

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-10)
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today October 2021 Number 10

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-10
    Newsletter
  • What GDPR and the Health Research Regulations (HRRs) mean for Ireland: a research perspective.

    Mee, Blanaid; Kirwan, Mary; Clarke, Niamh; Tanaka, Aoife; Manaloto, Lino; Halpin, Emma; Gibbons, Una; Cullen, Ann; McGarrigle, Sarah; Connolly, Elisabeth M; et al. (2020-07-29)
    Background: Irish Health Research Regulations (HRRs) were introduced following the European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2018. The HRRs described specific supplementary regulatory requirements for research regarding governance, processes and procedure that impact on several facets of research. The numerous problems that the HRRs and particularly "explicit consent" inadvertently created were presented under the auspices of the Irish Academy of Medical Sciences (IAMS) on November 25, 2019, at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Aims: The objective of this review was to obtain feedback and to examine the impact of GDPR and the HRRs on health research in Ireland in order to determine whether the preliminary feedback, presented at the IAMS meetings, was reflected at a national level. Methods: Individuals from the research community were invited to provide feedback on the impact, if any, of the HRRs on health research. Retrospective patient recruitment and consent outside a hospital setting for a multi-institutional Breast Predict study (funded by the Irish Cancer Society) were also analysed. Results: Feedback replicated the issues presented at the IAMS with additional concerns identified. Only 20% of the original target population (n = 1987) could be included in the Breast Predict study. Conclusions: Our results confirm that the HRRs have had a significantly negative impact on health research in Ireland. Urgent meaningful engagement between patient advocate groups, the research community and legislators would help ameliorate these impacts.
  • A risk score for prediction of venous thromboembolism in gynecologic cancer: The Thrombogyn score.

    Norris, Lucy A; Ward, Mark P; O'Toole, Sharon A; Marchocki, Zibi; Ibrahim, Nadia; Khashan, Ali S; Abu Saadeh, Feras; Gleeson, Noreen (2020-05-28)
    Background: Gynecologic cancers are associated with high rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is exacerbated by pelvic surgery and chemotherapy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a risk score for VTE in patients with gynecologic cancer and to test the predictive ability of the score following addition of procoagulant biomarker data. Patients and methods: Clinical and laboratory variables were used to develop a risk score for the prediction of VTE in patients with gynecological cancer (n = 616), which was validated in a separate cohort of patients (n = 406). Endogenous thrombin potential and D-dimer levels were determined in a subset (n = 290) of patients and used to produce an extended score in the validation cohort. Results: Multivariable regression analysis identified BMI >30, hemoglobin <11.5 g/dL and chemotherapy as independent predictors of VTE, which formed the Thrombogyn score. Following competing risk regression analysis, subdistribution hazard ratios (SHRs), adjusted for cancer stage, were 8.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-43.77) in the high-risk group (score = 2-3) and 4.12 (95% CI, 0.85-20.15) in the intermediate-risk group (score = 1) compared with the low-risk group (score = 0). SHRs for the validation cohort were 6.26 (95% CI, 1.24-31.39) and 3.00 (95% CI, 0.67-13.32), respectively. Cumulative incidence of VTE in the validation cohort high-risk group was 10.34% (95% CI, 6.51-16.41) per women-years compared with 1.06% (95% CI, 0.26-4.26) in the low-risk group. Using the extended Thrombogyn score, adjusted SHRs were 16.83 (95% CI, 4.20-67.37) in the high-risk group with a cumulative incidence of 21.15% (95% CI, 10.32-45.24). External validation of the score is required. Conclusions: The Thrombogyn score identifies patients with gynecologic cancer at high and low risk of VTE. Addition of biomarker data improves the predictive power of the score.
  • Development and relative validation of a short food frequency questionnaire for assessing dietary intakes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    Bredin, Carla; Naimimohasses, Sara; Norris, Suzanne; Wright, Ciara; Hancock, Neil; Hart, Kathryn; Moore, J Bernadette (2019-02-25)
    Fifty-five patients completed both the SFFQ and the 4DDD within 30 weeks; 42 (76%) were diagnosed with simple steatosis, whereas 13 (24%) had biopsy-proven steatohepatitis; the majority were overweight or obese, with a median (25th; 75th percentile) BMI of 33.2 kg/m2 (29.3; 36.0). Reported energy intakes were well below EER with a median intake of 73% of requirements, suggesting widespread under-reporting. Significant correlations were observed between sugar (r = 0.408, P = 0.002), fat (r = 0.44, P = 0.001), fruits (r = 0.51, P = 0.0001) and vegetables (r = 0.40, P = 0.0024) measurements by the SFFQ and 4DDD. Bland Altman plots with regression analysis demonstrated broad comparability with the 4DDD for intakes of fat (bias - 13.8 g/day) and sugar (bias  + 12.9 g/day).
  • Letter to the editor: HIV in women in the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region.

    Aebi-Popp, Karoline; Mulcahy, Fiona; Gilleece, Yvonne; On Behalf Of Wave (2020-01-30)

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